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Old 12-19-2009, 06:24 PM   #21
spitalhouse
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Originally Posted by haroldeye View Post
Checked with wiki and Eton was founded by Henry VI in 1440 specifically for the education of 70 Poor Boys. The fee payers sort of joined later.

Before the reformation all church schools were Roman Catholic (and educated people for the church). After the Reformation most of the church schools became protestant or anglo catholic Grammar schools and became far more secular. From about 1530 to roughly 1800 Roman Catholicism was not exactly the flavour of the month.
Eton College's origins as a charitable seat if learning are not in dispute; I merely pointed to the fact that Eton was the first school to describe itself as a 'public' school - which is a fact that stands irrespective of the principals upon which it was originally founded.

What is in dispute, however, is why the term 'public' is ascribed to the type of fee-paying schools that the rest of the world would regard as 'private' - which I think was the basis of the original query. In this context the term 'public' can not be inferred to mean free as in 'free of charge' (as you seemed to advocate), but merely free insofar as entry was not restricted (theoretically) on the grounds of class or religion.

Regards.
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Old 12-19-2009, 06:56 PM   #22
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Default Another question

This is, I assume, British slang, and I've never quite figured out the meaning: "Bob's your uncle."
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Old 12-19-2009, 07:02 PM   #23
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This is, I assume, British slang, and I've never quite figured out the meaning: "Bob's your uncle."
Bob's your uncle is a commonly used expression known mainly in Britain, Ireland and Commonwealth nations. It is often used immediately following a set of simple instructions and carries roughly the same meaning as the phrase "and there you have it" or "quickly"; for example, "To make a ham sandwich, simply put a piece of ham between two slices of buttered bread, and Bob's your uncle."

In some places in Britain, "Bob's your uncle" is also a way of saying "you're all set", "you've got it made!" or "that's great!" and is used as an expression of jubilation at good fortune. It is used thus in the Alastair Sim film Scrooge, a version of the classic Dickens story A Christmas Carol, where a reformed Ebenezer Scrooge confronts his housekeeper, Mrs Dilber, on Christmas morning. He gives her a guinea (£1.05 in that era, and equivalent to about $100 today) as a Christmas present, and announces he will significantly raise her salary. In a burst of excitement the housekeeper responds, “Bob’s yer uncle! Merry Christmas, Mr Scrooge, in keeping with the situation!”. However, this may be an anachronism, as A Christmas Carol was first published by Dickens in 1843 and as outlined above the expression (in the later film) was not in use at that time.

Usage has evolved to the expressions "Robert's your father's brother", "Robert's your auntie's husband" and "Robert's your mother's brother" as synonymous phrases. "Fanny's your aunt" appears later.
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Old 12-19-2009, 07:18 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Oswald View Post
Bob's your uncle is a commonly used expression known mainly in Britain, Ireland and Commonwealth nations. It is often used immediately following a set of simple instructions and carries roughly the same meaning as the phrase "and there you have it" or "quickly"; for example, "To make a ham sandwich, simply put a piece of ham between two slices of buttered bread, and Bob's your uncle."

In some places in Britain, "Bob's your uncle" is also a way of saying "you're all set", "you've got it made!" or "that's great!" and is used as an expression of jubilation at good fortune. It is used thus in the Alastair Sim film Scrooge, a version of the classic Dickens story A Christmas Carol, where a reformed Ebenezer Scrooge confronts his housekeeper, Mrs Dilber, on Christmas morning. He gives her a guinea (£1.05 in that era, and equivalent to about $100 today) as a Christmas present, and announces he will significantly raise her salary. In a burst of excitement the housekeeper responds, “Bob’s yer uncle! Merry Christmas, Mr Scrooge, in keeping with the situation!”. However, this may be an anachronism, as A Christmas Carol was first published by Dickens in 1843 and as outlined above the expression (in the later film) was not in use at that time.

Usage has evolved to the expressions "Robert's your father's brother", "Robert's your auntie's husband" and "Robert's your mother's brother" as synonymous phrases. "Fanny's your aunt" appears later.
Ask a question and, quick as a flash thanks to Oswald, Bob's your uncle and there you have it!
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Old 12-19-2009, 08:47 PM   #25
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Ask a question and, quick as a flash thanks to Oswald, Bob's your uncle and there you have it!
The expression may refer to Robert Cecil,Lord Salisbury giving the prestigious post of Chief Secretary for Ireland to his nephew Arthur Balfour,Hence Bob's your uncle.
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:58 PM   #26
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I never had an uncle Bob - which is a pity, because I think Bob is an excellent name for an uncle. I did however have an uncle Dickie, which is also quite a good name for an uncle - but not as solid or dependable as Bob. A Bob will always be there for you and teach you how to roller-skate or help you build a go-cart, whereas a Dickie will lead you astray by showing you the best way to dodge a bus fare or bunk into the pictures. On second thoughts, I think I prefer Dickie.

Regards.
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Old 12-20-2009, 11:57 AM   #27
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Well, I'd never say that I prefer Dickie, but anyway, we say "Bob's your uncle" over here, too. Like..."just turn it this way, and nail it right there, and bang! Bob's your uncle"! Done!
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Old 12-20-2009, 02:49 PM   #28
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'Bollocks' seems to be a very British word. i have travelled to america on many occasions and i have never heard it said, with 'nuts' seeming to be the popular alternative.

it is a very widely used term in UK english, for instance kick in the bollocks = kick in the nuts.

never mind the bollocks = forget the bullshit/nonsense

have a bollocking = get told off/ chastised/ reprimanded

well, you've bollocksed that = you've f**ked it up/ broke it

drop a bollock = make a mistake

bollocks to this = contempt/ f**k it

dog's bollocks = the best eg my cars the dog's bollocks

work your bollocks off = work really hard

talking bollocks = popularly thought to come from the name of old preists who were referred to as ballocks... and talk rubbish during sermons = talking ballocks... leading to todays literal meaning.

in the middle ages a special knife was adapted to deal with fallen knights in armour who were dispatched by going up under the armour and stabbing the crotch area and was referred to as a "ballock knife". This dagger had a pair of symmetrical oval swellings located on each side of the hilt at the guard, clearly made to resemble male genitalia.

bollocky is commonly used australian slang for naked.....

where we british prefer stark bollock naked......

now that you are scratching your bollocks because you are completely bollocksed by the bollocks i have posted i'm gonna carry on sitting here on my bollocks and see what other bollocks people have posted. bollocks to this i'll leave yer to it....
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Old 12-20-2009, 06:02 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Mal Hombre View Post
The expression may refer to Robert Cecil,Lord Salisbury giving the prestigious post of Chief Secretary for Ireland to his nephew Arthur Balfour,Hence Bob's your uncle.
I'm sure the Irish were thrilled, not that they had any say in it.
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Old 12-20-2009, 06:26 PM   #30
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Default The Undertones

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Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post
Wednesday Week
Written by Elvis Costello
Performed by Elvis Costello & The Attractions
Produced by Nick Lowe
Musicians Elvis Costello - vocals, guitar
Steve Nieve - keyboards
Bruce Thomas - bass
Pete Thomas - drums
Recorded August-September 1978, Eden Studios, London
Released December 18, 1978
Wednesday Week by The Undertones

Here she comes to say good night
I'll get no sleep tonight
With a constant vision she still can see
She was the girl for me

Wednesday week - she loved me
Wednesday week - never happened at all

There she goes I want to see her again
She's gone to school with her best friend
She only does the things she likes to do
Now she wants something new

Wednesday week ...

Here she comes ...

Wednesday week
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