View Single Post
Old 10-29-2012, 09:17 AM   #24
Darth Joules
Veteran
 
Darth Joules's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,502
Thanks: 11,945
Thanked 67,474 Times in 3,157 Posts
Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+Darth Joules 250000+
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by effCup View Post
I'm having problems with "shadow" from the other side of the magazine paper I'm trying to scan. I've got a sheet of matt opaque brown paper to use as "backing", plus books to sit on top, but some scans still have "shadow" from black text or white areas on the other side. Is it worth trying to fix in, say, Photoshop? How?
I use card, rather than paper. Thin card from an art shop. It might be worth trying a different shade of colour card. I mostly use a dark choclate brown sheet, but also have use four other shades sometimes: black, dark gray, mid-grey, and light brown. If the reverse is still ghosting through, it could be the paper stock of the magazine is too thin. I get this problem somtimes with cheaper mags and there's little to prevent it from happening. Fixing it requires some time consuming editing in Photoshop layering/painting/cloning, but most of the time it isn't worth it.

Also, don't put too many books on top of the magazine or the scanner's lid or you could crack the glass platen.


Quote:
Also: does anyone else use Photoshop's transform-skew to "square"-up scans? I've just tried a couple and it's fiddly/time-consuming--probably just because I'm a novice with graphics apps.--but I was pleased with the results. The main thing to beware of is if the image contains text--i.e. text is rectilinear so shows badly with any skew beyond marginal levels.
Use Edit > Transform > Rotate. Typically if I'm matching up two halves, the first half will be squared up using Rotate Canvas > Abritary. Then the canvas will be expanded to make room for the second half. The second half is copied and pasted onto the first, so it's on another layer. The second half is moved and rotated until it lines up with the first. When you select Rotate there's a crosshair in the center of the image you're about to edit, this can be moved to anywhere within the work space and acts as the pivot point.
Darth Joules is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Darth Joules For This Useful Post: