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Old 06-07-2012, 07:43 PM   #285
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Originally Posted by blueballsdc View Post
There were a lot of anti-German sentiments in the US which is a little surprising considering the number of German immigrants this country had. Cities changed names of streets that were German or "German sounding" and a lot of people changed their names for the same reason (including some of my relatives).

Some people even changed the names of food items that were too German.
My great-grandmother was from Wisconsin -- German was her first language. She was in grade school, when German was expunged.

One idea that I've had is that the anti-German sentiment was partly an echo not-then-so-old Civil War resentments -- ethnic Germans were more concentrated in free States and associated with the Union. Britain was, by contrast, much more closely linked to the Confederacy.

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Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Approximately 516,000 (23.4% of all Union soldiers) were immigrants; about 216,000 of these were born in Germany. New York supplied the largest number of these native-born Germans with 36,000. Behind the Empire State came Missouri with 30,000 and Ohio with 20,000.
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