View Single Post
Old 08-28-2013, 08:08 AM   #12
VintageKell
Vintage Member
 
VintageKell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Underground in the Mountains of Madness
Posts: 2,787
Thanks: 1,015
Thanked 80,354 Times in 2,803 Posts
VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+VintageKell 350000+
Default The Healing Tool

Last post from me in this thread concerns the Healing tool (or scratch repair tool), that later versions of the editing applications have. The GIMP application for example, which is linked to in the thread has a 'heal' function. These are very similar to the cloning tool, in that a selected area of the image is copied on to another area of the image, but the difference is that it attempts to blend in the repair by using information held in the surrrounding edge of the damaged section. This obviously has limitations, for example if the edge of the area to be repaired doesn't match what was in the damaged area.

1. Select the heal or repair option (two examples on image).



2. Use the tool to select the area with the scratch (choose a width that is about 3 or 4 pixels wider than the scratch or the repair loses details.), and let go of selection to try to erase it. The Scratch Remover tool uses the background image details at edge of selection to create new information to attempt to replace the scratch in the rest of the selected area.

Tip: You should check results after each change because they can be imperfect, and touching up with the clone tool afterwards can improve the end results by making the repair/heal blend better.

NB:
  • These tools works best for scratches on relatively smooth backgrounds and only on the main image i.e. The background image ... it is not available when you are working on layers which this thread isn't going to cover (well not by me as its too complex an area to cover in these quick posts).
  • To remove scratches from a textured background, the Clone tool may be more effective. See the Cloning post.
Different applications have additional functions in this area, such as the Automatic Small Scratch Removal Command in PSP9 which I can't cover here, so best tip, if you have this function use the application help to find out how to get the best out of the tool and any additional functions it offers.

Personally I prefer the clone tool as I find it its easier to control, but for certain small repairs this tool is useful as it does the blending for you .....

Well good luck with repairing those battered polaroids of yesteryear and remember the main two tips;
  1. Always use copies, never the original to make changes on, and
  2. Practise makes perfect (literally in this case)

Cheers VK

Last edited by VintageKell; 08-28-2013 at 10:16 AM..
VintageKell is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to VintageKell For This Useful Post: